What the EITI stands for

The global ‘Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative’ (EITI) advocates more financial transparency and accountability in the extractive sector.

Founded in 2003, the initiative had its first origins as part of the 2002 Sustainability Summit in Johannesburg, South Africa. It is based on close cooperation between governments, companies and civil societies in more than 50 countries. These countries disclose information on tax payments, licenses, quantities extracted and other important data about the extraction of oil, gas and mineral resources.

The populations of resource-rich countries can particularly benefit by doing so, because where information on revenues is disclosed, there is less mistrust and fewer conflicts – and funds can foster the economic and social development of a country.
The EITI also promotes an informed debate on the policies regarding natural resources and their use by making information available to the public. This enables the citizens of a country to hold those responsible for politics and the economy more accountable.

Why is the EITI globally important?
Improved management of public revenues
Improved investment climate
More favourable loans
Control of corruption
Information for and participation of the population
Improved management of public revenues
Improved investment climate
More favourable loans
Control of corruption
Information for and participation of the population

More than 50 countries worldwide are now implementing the EITI Standard. Progress in implementing the EITI Standard is assessed in the validation process using the following categories:

  • Satisfactory progress
  • Meaningful progress
  • Inadequate progress / suspended
  • Countries that have not yet been validated against the EITI Standard.

Status of the map shown: October 2021.

An overview of which country is at which stage of EITI implementation can be found here (EN).

Together with their respective governments, more than 60 major oil, gas and mining companies have agreed to officially support the EITI. In addition, numerous international and civil society organizations are committed to the EITI. These include 400 non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the International Council of Mining and Metals, and regional development banks. These organizations provide technical and financial support to countries implementing the EITI Standard and promote the dissemination of the EITI.

For more information on the objectives, requirements and implementation in other countries, please visit www.eiti.org (EN).

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